The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing

The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing

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In The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing, Jon Stewart argues that there is a close relation between content and form in philosophical writing. While this might seem obvious at first glance, it is overlooked in the current climate of Anglophone academic philosophy, which, Stewart contends, accepts only a single genre as proper for philosophical expression. Stewart demonstrates the uniformity of today's philosophical writing by contrasting it with that of the past. Taking specific texts from the history of philosophy and literature as case studies, Stewart shows how the use of genres like dialogues, plays and short stories were an entirely suitable and effective means of presenting and arguing for philosophical positions given the concrete historical and cultural contexts in which they appeared. Now, Stewart argues, the prevailing intolerance means that the same texts are dismissed as unphilosophical merely due to their form, although their content is, in fact, profoundly philosophical. The book's challenge to current conventions of philosophical is provocative and timely, and will be of great interest to students and scholars of philosophy, literature and history.The philosophical paper in essay form was immediately recognized as well adopted for this purpose.6 Its brevity and concise ... the idea is clearly that one should present a short paper written according to the accepted professional standards.

Title:The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing
Author:Jon Stewart
Publisher:A&C Black - 2013-07-18


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