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The essays in this collection celebrate the signal achievement of Dieter Riemenschneider in helping found and consolidate the study of postcolonial anglophone literatures in Germany and Europe. As well as poems, a short story, drawings of the Indian scene (the first, and abiding, focus of this scholar's work), and 'letters' of reminiscence (one quite grave), there are revealing contributions of a literary-historical nature on the establishment of anglophone (especially African) literatures as an academic discipline within Germany, the UK, and Northern Europe generally, as well as a group of searching reflections on such topics of postcolonial import as globalization and the applicability of models to the literature of the indigene in Canada and Australia. The largest section is devoted to individual topics, each treatment implicitly keyed to approaches to the teaching of New Literatures texts. Writers covered include Anita Desai (landscape and memory), Salman Rushdie (painting inThe Moor's Last Sigh), Charlotte BrontAl (imperial discourse in Jane Eyre), Derek Walcott (Omeros and cultural cohabitation), and Witi Ihimaera (his rewriting of Katherine Mansfield). Topics dealt with include music and radio in West Africa, the African literary 'hit parade', the New Zealand prose poem, Canadian and Australian war fiction, the Middle Passage in the American and Caribbean novel, Paul Theroux's uneasy relations with V.S. Naipaul, and the colonial discourse of illness and recuperation. The volume closes with Dieter Riemenschneider's very first and most recent critical essays, the one a classic on Mulk Raj Anand, the other a challenging and doubtless controversial thesis on postcolonial minority writing. A select bibliography of Riemenschneider's work (books, edited publications, journal articles and book contributions, reviews and broadcasts) rounds off this substantial collection.Progress and Process in Teaching the New Literatures in English : Essays in Honour of Dieter Riemenschneider ... followed by aquot;What made the old society collapse in Things Fall Apart?, aquot; the land question in Ngugia#39;s Weep Not Cluld, and anbsp;...

Author:Gordon Collier, Frank Schulze-Engler
Publisher:Rodopi - 2002-01-01


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