Alexander Pope and the Traditions of Formal Verse Satire

Alexander Pope and the Traditions of Formal Verse Satire

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Ranging over the tradition of verse satire from the Roman poets to their seventeenth- and eighteenth-century imitators in England and France, Howard D. Weinbrot challenges the common view of Alexander Pope as a Horatian satirist in a Horatian age. Originally published in 1982. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.For further discussion of Popea#39;s scheme, see George Sherburn, a€œPope at Work, a€ in Essays on the Eighteenth Century ... Ideas of World Harmony, a€ Traditio, 2 ( 1944): 409-64, and 3 (1945): 307-64; Maynard Mack, in the Twickenham Essay onanbsp;...

Title:Alexander Pope and the Traditions of Formal Verse Satire
Author:Howard D. Weinbrot
Publisher:Princeton University Press - 2014-07-14


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